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The Angels love life on tour

ALL IN ONE PLACE: The Angels will play Noosaville on March 31.
ALL IN ONE PLACE: The Angels will play Noosaville on March 31. Craig Peihopa

LIVING in Tasmania, enjoying a morning coffee in his favourite cafe, might not seem very rock'n'roll. But for Rick Brewster, founding member of legendary rock band The Angels, life is good.

"I have lived here for about nine-and-a-half years,” Brewster said.

"The band is a bit scattered these days: we have three in Adelaide and one in Sydney.

"Flights are cheaper and communications are better.

"It is pretty easy to live where you want.”

But Brewster's idyllic lifestyle will come to a temporary halt next month when he gets the band back together for a tour through New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria, including a stopover on the Sunshine Coast on Friday, March 31.

Even so, life on the road isn't as tough as it used to be, with the military-style convoys a thing of the past.

"Tours used to be six to eight weeks,” Brewster said.

"You would stay on the road and have trucks or a semi-trailer hauling all the gear, and there would be a full road crew.

"We don't do that now. We fly in, hire local technicians and equipment.

"It is possible now.

"In the old days, you couldn't rely on crew you didn't know.”

Instead, Brewster said plenty of contacts from years of touring understood The Angels and their live-performance needs.

"We have a network of people who we can call, all over Australia,” he said.

Also marking a big departure from the traditional concert tour is the "4x4” format the band is using to choose the set list.

"It was a flash idea our manager Tony Grace had,” Brewster said.

"When he explained it to us, it sounded great.”

With four decades of rock'n'roll to their credit, the band is choosing songs from one album from each decade for each show.

"There will be no two nights that are the same,” Brewster said.

"The old rule will apply: something old, something new and something blue.”

After many years of touring with original frontman, the late Doc Neeson, Brewster said fans had no issues when Screaming Jets singer Dave Gleeson took over.

"The fans have taken to Dave as the frontman,” Brewster said.

"What a lot of people don't realise is Doc had left two years previously.

"Dave got involved because he left.

"People just love him.

"He is different, but respectful of the music.

"He was a fan of the band, and knew all the songs when he started.

"He relates well to us and to the audience.”

The Angels play Villa Noosa Hotel, Noosaville, at 8pm on March 31.

Topics:  live music the angels whatson


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