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10 dink-di phrases we need to bring back

FLAT CHAT: You may look mad as a cut snake rattling off these Aussie sayings, but at least you'll be true blue.
FLAT CHAT: You may look mad as a cut snake rattling off these Aussie sayings, but at least you'll be true blue. AnnaGreen

How true blue are you?

Drop a few of these phrases around the barbie on Friday and show your mates what a dinki-di Aussie you are.

1. Rattle your dags.

Meaning: Hurry up.

Used in a sentence: I'm off to the Australia Day awards so you'd better rattle your dags!

2. Lobster.

Meaning: An Australian $20 note (called a lobster because it is red in colour).

Used in a sentence: Mate can you lend us a lobster, I left my wallet at home!

3. Reg Grundys.

Meaning: Underwear.

Used in a sentence: Just swim in your Reg Grundys.

4. She'll be apples.

Meaning: Everything will be alright

Used in a sentence: Give it another go, she'll be apples.

5. Best thing since sliced bread.

Meaning: A good invention, a good happening, something good.

Used in a sentence: Bob reckons his new mower is the best thing since sliced bread.

6. Smile like a split watermelon.

Meaning: Someone with a big smile.

Used in a sentence: Look at Joey with his sanga, he's got a smile like a split watermelon.

7. Lemon spread.

Meaning: Rhyming slang for head.

Used in a sentence: She hit her hubby right in the lemon spread for coming home drunk again.

8. Tickets to the trots.

Meaning: Toilet paper.

Used in a sentence: Hand us another roll of tickets to the trots please.

9. Ham and eggs and duck under the table.

Meaning: Nothing for dinner.

Used in a sentence: What's for dinner? Ham and eggs and duck under the table!

10. Happy as a tin of worms goin' fishing.

Meaning: Not very happy.

Used in a sentence: The old bloke lost his job today... he looks as happy as a tin of worms goin' fishing!

Topics:  aussie slang australia day australian phrases true blue